A Deadly Wandering:A Tale of Tragedy and Redemption in the Age of Attention by Matt Richtel

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A must read for our times. The story is true, an Utah College student, Reggie Shaw, has a car accident on a morning driving through Montana.. It is about this deadly distraction,”texting while driving” and sadly,the facts are he killed two scientists.

A Deadly Wandering from Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Matt Richtel, a brilliant, narrative-driven exploration of technology’s vast influence on the human mind and society, dramatically-told through the lens of a tragic “texting-while-driving” car crash that claimed the lives of two rocket scientists in 2006.

The story has two levels. It explores the neuroscience of attention and makes a readable, understandable case that we are “addicted” to technology. Richtel explains the scientific findings regarding human attention and the impact of devices like phones and computers on people. But the other level is looking at the families effected by this accident and the investigation, prosecution, and trial that follows. Ultimately, Reggie finds redemption and ends up becoming a leading advocate against “distracted driving”. The narrative written by Richtel is also an interesting commentary on the lawyering up and the silence of the accused which fuels the rage of the families of the deceased who want answers and are stonewalled until the trial and even afterwards.

“It isn’t preachy and it isn’t dry, instead, Richtel combines the story of a Utah boy who killed two rocket scientists while he was driving his car while texting with the scientific research surrounding attention, focus and our modern technology. Richtel delivers the history of cognitive neuroscience, from its origins in World War II, helping pilots and radar operators save lives by not being overwhelmed by the technology in front of them, to later M.R.I. brain studies of multitasking and what came to be called attention science.” The book is unsettling, “The intimacy of smartphones is, if not addictive, then certainly seductive. Not all distractions are created equal: The impairment of drunken driving, for instance, is consistently huge, while the impairment of texting is ­arguably more intense but shorter in duration. The researchers Richtel quotes have found that drivers are impaired for up to 15 seconds after they text — far longer than most drivers would ever think.”NY Times review of Deadly Wandering / Kolker Sept. 25, 2014

Ordinary people do not intentionally set out to do bad things  but the simple tasks of texting while driving can lead to tragic consequences. Reggie’s story  confirms that and more, the healing that comes with admission and taking responsibility. Kolker had the perfect things to say about “A Deadly Wandering” by Richtel so thus my reference to his review. Thank you, and please read “A Deadly Wandering” as it so applies to our times.

Tracys2cents

 

 

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